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Jesus Is Lord What does Jesus is Lord mean?
Romans 10:9 says 'If you confess with your lips that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved.'

Affirming Jesus is Lord is central to our salvation. Saying 'Jesus is Lord' has two basic types of meaning. One is our relationship to Jesus; the other is who Jesus really is. One way I sum up the two meanings is:
Jesus is my master.
Jesus is Yahweh God.

How we relate to Jesus should be the consequence of knowing who he is.

In the Greek translation of the Bible that was used in the time of Jesus, the personal name of God, YAHWEH, was translated into Greek as Kurios - Lord in Greek letters(kurios), usually translated into English as Lord or Master.

The Apostles and New Testament writers often quoted Old Testament passages about the LORD (YaHWeH), but made clear that they believed the passages spoke of Jesus Christ the Messiah. They also consistently gave Jesus powerful titles which were used for YaHWeH in the Old Testament. It would surely shock anyone who believed in the LORD God of the Law and the Prophets to see His titles and descriptions placed upon Jesus of Nazareth. The Apostles knew the Old Testament well. They purposely used the titles and descriptions of the LORD God in the Law and Prophets for Jesus Christ in the New Testament. They were not blaspheming or confused, They were making a point- that God himself took on a human body to live visibly on the earth and to redeem mankind. John put it this way: 'the Word was God.... the Word became flesh and lived among us' (John 1:1,14).

But believing, knowing who Jesus is, is not enough.
James wrote, 'Even the demons believe-and shudder.'

'Jesus is Lord' means also my master. One I should obey and has power over me. Receiving Jesus as Lord means that my constant overriding goal should be to be to obey him. Nothing else should matter. Jesus' last command in Matthew is

'Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, to the close of the age.' Matthew 28.19-20

We are to obey; to observe all that Jesus commanded.

'Master' also means that Jesus has power of life and death over me -- over us. Not just us who believe. Jesus could have called on an army legion of angels to save him, have called down fire from heaven to destroy those who rejected him. Jesus has power of life and death over believers and unbelievers, human rulers of nations and demons, the whole world; not just the world, the entire universe. He is the meaning of the universe; what its being is about. This is what existance is about -- anything and everything's existance. My being, and your being.

It is in our interest to live according to the nature of reality. This is Reality - the One who made the universe is the one who died to save us. The one who keeps the universe working is also the personal friend Jesus. If I jump off a cliff and don't believe in gravity, does that effect the result?

The central fact of reality is Jesus is Lord. Do we always act and think and feel with this basic fact the central premise? Is this how we always live??

I know my life is not always focused on Jesus. Our whole being is to be focused on our Lord. If it is not -- when it is not -- the biblical call is to repent; change -- transform -- our minds until our whole life is focused on Jesus Christ.

I am going to lead a prayer of repentance. If it is true to you, repeat after me:

Lord Jesus,
we have not always put you first.
Our lives have not always be in submission to you.
Our hearts have not always been focused on you.
Forgive us,
Change us,
turn us around,
transform us!
In Jesus' Name, Amen

Litany: Who is Jesus?
Who is Jesus?

Leader: Who is Jesus?
Reader 1 John 13:13 You call me Teacher and Lord-and you are right, for that is what I am.

Leader: Jesus is Lord and teacher. Who is Jesus?
Reader 2
Matthew 16:15 Jesus said to his disciples, 'But who do you say that I am?'
16 Simon Peter replied, 'You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God.'
17 And Jesus answered him, 'Blessed are you, Simon Bar-Jona! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father who is in heaven.
18 And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the powers of death shall not prevail against it.

Leader: Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God. Who is Jesus?
Reader 3 Romans 10:9 If you confess with your lips that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved.

John 3:36 Whoever believes in the Son has eternal life; whoever disobeys the Son will not see life, but must endure God’s wrath.

Acts 4:11 This Jesus is ‘the stone that was rejected by you, the builders; it has become the cornerstone.’ 12 There is salvation in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven given among mortals by which we must be saved.'

Hebrews 2:3 how can we escape if we neglect so great a salvation?

Leader: Jesus is Savior. Who is Jesus?

Reader 4
John 3:16 'For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him may not perish but may have eternal life.
John 3:18 Those who believe in him are not condemned; but those who do not believe are condemned already, because they have not believed in the name of the only Son of God.

Leader: Jesus is God's only son. Who is Jesus?
Reader 5
1 Corinthians 8:6 yet for us there is one God, the Father, from whom are all things and for whom we exist, and one Lord, Jesus Christ, through whom are all things and through whom we exist.
John 1.1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.
2 He was in the beginning with God;
3 all things were made through him, and without him was not anything made that was made.

Leader: Jesus is the creator, the Word of God. Who is Jesus?
Reader 6
Revelation 19.11 ¶ Then I saw heaven opened, and there was a white horse! Its rider is called Faithful and True, and in righteousness he judges and makes war.
12 His eyes are like a flame of fire, and on his head are many diadems; and he has a name inscribed that no one knows but himself.
13 He is clothed in a robe dipped in blood, and his name is called The Word of God.
14 And the armies of heaven, wearing fine linen, white and pure, were following him on white horses.
15 From his mouth comes a sharp sword with which to strike down the nations, and he will rule them with a rod of iron; he will tread the wine press of the fury of the wrath of God the Almighty.
16 On his robe and on his thigh he has a name inscribed, 'King of kings and Lord of lords.'
Leader: Jesus is King of kings and Lord of lords. Who is Jesus?
Reader 7
John 20:28 Thomas answered Jesus, 'My Lord and my God!'

Leader: Jesus is Lord and God.
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Revelation The Book of Revelation, often simply known as Revelation or by a number of variants expanding upon its authorship or subject matter, is the final book of the New Testament and occupies a central part in Christian eschatology. Written in Koine Greek, its title is derived from the first word of the text, apokalypsis, meaning 'unveiling' or 'revelation'. The author of the work identifies himself in the text as 'John' and says that he was on Patmos, an island in the Aegean, when he 'heard a great voice' instructing him to write the book. This John is traditionally supposed to be John the Apostle, although recent scholarship has suggested other possibilities including a putative figure given the name John of Patmos. Most modern scholars believe it was written around 95 AD, with some believing it dates from around 70 AD.

The book spans three literary genres: epistolary, apocalyptic, and prophetic. It begins with an epistolary address to the reader followed by an apocalyptic description of a complex series of events derived from prophetic visions which the author claims to have seen. These include the appearance of a number of figures and images which have become important in Christian eschatology, such as the Whore of Babylon and the Beast, and culminate in the Second Coming of Jesus Christ. The obscure and extravagant[1] imagery has led to a wide variety of interpretations: historicist interpretations see in Revelation a broad view of history; preterist interpretations treat Revelation as mostly referring to the events of the apostolic era (1st century), or—at the latest—the fall of the Roman Empire; futurists believe that Revelation describes future events; and idealist or symbolic interpretations consider that Revelation does not refer to actual people or events, but is an allegory of the spiritual path and the ongoing struggle between good and evil.

The Book of Revelation is the only apocalyptic document in the New Testament canon, though there are short apocalyptic passages in various places in the Gospels and the Epistles
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Bible I Kings In the Hebrew Scriptures the book of Kings (ylm) was originally one book

1. Kings was broken into two books for convenience sake because of its length

2. Josephus' limitation of the Hebrew canon to twenty-four books seems to verify a unified Kings:

a. Lamentations may have been with Jeremiah

b. Ruth may have been with Judges

c. Kings may have been one book

C. The English has adopted the fourfold division of the historical books after the Greek Septuagint but with the Hebrew names of 1 and 2 Samuel and 1 and 2 Kings

D. The Books of Samuel and Kings cover Israel's period as a nation under a king:

1. Samuel--Saul

2. Samuel--David

3. Kings--Solomon and the divided kingdom

4. Kings--The fall of the divided kingdoms of Israel and Judah

E. Placement in the Hebrew Scriptures: One of the Prophets

1. The Prophets is grouped into Former Prophets (Joshua-2 Kings [not including Ruth]) and Latter Prophets (Isaiah-Malachi [without Lamentations and Daniel.

F. Placement in the Greek/English Scriptures: One of the Historical Books

1. As with the Greek Septuagint (LXX) 1 and 2 Kings are grouped along with the twelve historical books (Joshua to Esther).

2. As Walton and Hill write, “the books share a prophetic view of history in which cause and effect are tied to the blessings and cursings of the covenant.”
II. AUTHOR OF KINGS:11 An Anonymous Editor-Compiler-Author (Jeremiah?) from the sixth century B.C.

A. The Deuteronomistic School:

1. A late eighth or early seventh century school which aligned itself with Judah and the reforms of Josiah (640-608 B.C.) and extended through the exilic period writing historical works supports the principles in Deuteronomy (a late book written for Josiah’s reforms

2. This theory requires Deuteronomy to be a late document which was composed to support Josiah’s reforms (622 B.C.)

3. The theory suggests that the editors then rewrote Joshua-Kings to express the interests of theological reform which were expressed in the forged Deuteronomy.

4. Kings would have been written in two redactions: (1) pre-exilic during Josiah’s reign and reforms which explains the pro-southern kingdom tone, and (2) exilic prompted by the release of Jehoiachin (560 B.C.) and dated around 550 B.C.

5. However, Deuteronomy demonstrates unity on the level of a second millennium Hittite suzerainty-vassel treaty. This argues sharply against a late creation of the document, and thus the necessity of a Deuteronomistic school as its creators and thus the creators of Kings

6. Yes, Kings are Deuteronomistic in that they reflect the theology of Deuteronomy, but it is a Mosaic theology and not a fabricated theology to support the reform under Josiah

B. Jeremiah the Prophet:

1. Traditional Jewish scholarship has identified the writing/compiling of this book with the prophet Jeremiah

2. Some of the basis for the identification of Jeremiah with Kings is the similarity of Jeremiah 52 with 2 Kings 24--25

3. Another support for Jeremiah as the author is that the history of Kings gives prominence to the place of true prophets in both the Israelite and Judean ministries

4. Another support for Jeremiah is that the writer seems to have been an eye witness to the fall of Jerusalem (586 B.C.)

5. Those who identify Jeremiah as the author consider the historical abstracts at the end of 2 Kings (Gedaliah, governor of Judah in 2 Ki. 25:22-26, and Jehoiachin’s release in Babylon in 2 Ki. 25:27-30) as being latter additions

6. Also the author of Kings does not use the familiar names for the kings of Judah as Jeremiah did (cf. 2 Ki. 24:8)

7. Richard D. Patterson and Hermann J. Austel write, “Despite the lack of dogmatic certainty, a reasonable case can be made for Jeremianic authorship (cf. G. Archer, SOTI rev. p. 289). S. J. Shultz (‘Kings,’ ZPEB, 3:812) affirms the likelihood that ‘the prophets kept the records throughout the generations of the Hebrew Kingdoms.’ Since he was descended from the priestly line of Abiathar, and since in all probability his father, Hilkiah, was active in communicating both the traditional facts and the teaching of Israel’s past, it is very likely that Jeremiah had access to historical and theological source materials. Furthermore he would have had more ready entrée to royal annals than any other prophet. Certainly no other prophet was so intimately involved in the final stages of Judah’s history. If so, Jeremiah may have been active in composing the greater part of the history of the book of Kings (1 Kings 14-- 2Kings 23:30) during the so-called silent years of his prophetic ministry after his call in 627 B.C., during the long reign of the godly Josiah. Certainly the contents of all but the last appendix (2 Kings 25:27-30) could have been written by Jeremiah. Perhaps this was added by Baruch or drawn from Jeremiah 40--44, possibly also was written by the same writer as a bridge to the later historical notice concerning Jehoiachin.

C. An Anonymous Editor-Compiler-Author of the Sixth Century B.C.

1. This allows for the historical abstracts at the end of 2 Kings 25

2. This writer probably was a an exile who lived in Babylon during the captivity (2 Kings 25:27-30)

This could not have been Jeremiah since he died in captivity in Egypt

3. This may or may not have been a prophet

4. Some have felt that it was either Ezra or Ezekiel

5. He certainly used sources

6. He had a sense of how the northern and southern kingdoms' histories were built upon their covenant relationship with the Lord
III. SOURCES USED IN KINGS: Several sources were used in the construction of the books of kings:

A. Those which are specifically mentioned:

1. The Book of Acts of Solomon (1 Kings 11:41)

2. The Book of the Chronicles/Annals of the Kings of Israel (mentioned seventeen times in 1 Kings 14:29--2 Kings 15:31)

3. The Book of the Chronicles/Annals of the Kings of Judah (1 Kings 15:23)

B. Those which are not specifically mentioned, but are proposed by some:

1. The Succession Narrative or Court Memoirs/History of David 1 Kings 1:1--2:11

2. An Elijah-Elisha Prophetic Cycle with the House of Ahab (1 Kings 16:29--2 Kings 13)

3. An Isaiah Source (2 Kings 18:13--20:19)

4. An independent Prophetic Source

5. Two concluding Historical Abstracts (2 Kings 25:22-26, 27-30)
IV. DATES AND CHRONOLOGY FOR THE BOOKS OF KINGS:

A. The books of Kings were Written between 560 and 538/539 B.C.

1. The last event recorded in 2 Kings 25:27-30 is the release of Jehoichin from prison during the thirty-seventh year of his imprisonment (560 B.C. [597 B.C. minus 37 years of captivity = 560 B.C.]). This marks the earliest date that Kings could have been completed

2. Since there is no mention of a return to Jerusalem after the captivity, it is probable that the book was written before that event in 538/539 B.C. This marks the latest date that Kings could have been written.
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Electrum Blite Electrum is a naturally occurring alloy of gold and silver, with trace amounts of copper and other metals. It has also been produced artificially. The ancient Greeks called it 'gold' or 'white gold', as opposed to 'refined gold'. Its color ranges from pale to bright yellow, depending on the proportions of gold and silver. The gold content of naturally occurring electrum in modern Western Anatolia ranges from 70 to 90, in contrast to the 45–55 of electrum used in ancient Lydian coinage of the same geographical area. This suggests that one reason for the invention of coinage in that area was to increase the profits from seignorage by issuing currency with a lower gold content than the commonly circulating metal.

Electrum was used as early as the third millennium BC in Old Kingdom Egypt, sometimes as an exterior coating to the pyramidions atop ancient Egyptian pyramids and obelisks.

Electrum was also used in the making of ancient drinking vessels and coins. This is where we come in. ElectrumBlite.com
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Penticostal Classical Pentecostals have a renewal type of faith within Christianity that places special emphasis on a direct personal experience of God through the baptism with the Holy Spirit. The term Pentecostal is derived from Pentecost, the Greek name for the Jewish Feast of Weeks. For Christians, Pentecost or Shavuot has many names in the Bible (the Feast of Weeks, the Feast of Harvest, and the Latter Firstfruits). Celebrated on the fiftieth day after Passover, Shavuot is traditionally a joyous time of giving thanks and presenting offerings for the new grain of the summer wheat harvest in Israel. The name 'Feast of Weeks' was given because God commanded the Jews in Leviticus 23:15-16, to count seven full weeks (or 49 days) beginning on the second day of Passover, and then present offerings of new grain to the Lord as a lasting ordinance. The observance of the Feast of Weeks or Pentecost is recorded in the Old Testament in Exodus 34:22, Leviticus 23:15-22, Deuteronomy 16:16, 2 Chronicles 8:13 and Ezekiel 1. Some of the most exciting events in the New Testament revolve around the Day of Pentecost in the book of Acts, chapter 2. Pentecost is also mentioned in Acts 20:16, 1 Corinthians 16:8 and James 1:18. This event commemorates the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the followers of Jesus Christ, as described in the second chapter of the Book of Acts.
Penticostals adhere to the inerrancy of scripture and the necessity of accepting Christ as personal Lord and Savior. they are distinguished by belief in the baptism with the Holy Spirit as an experience separate from conversion that enables a Christian to live a Holy Spirit–filled and empowered life. This empowerment includes the use of spiritual gifts such as speaking in tongues, miracles and 7 other gifts defining the characteristics of Pentecostals. Because of their commitment to biblical authority, spiritual gifts, and the miraculous, Pentecostals tend to see their faith as reflecting the same kind of spiritual power and teachings that were found in the Apostolic Age of the early church. For this reason, some Pentecostals also use the term Apostolic or full gospel to describe their Faith.
In Acts 1, just before the resurrected Jesus is taken up into heaven, he tells the disciples about the Father's promised gift of the Holy Spirit, which will soon be given to them in the form of a powerful baptism. He tells them to wait in Jerusalem until they receive the gift of the Holy Spirit, which will empower them to go out into the world and be his witnesses.
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Pentecostal Church Classical Pentecostals have a renewal type of faith within Christianity that places special emphasis on a direct personal experience of God through the baptism with the Holy Spirit. The term Pentecostal is derived from Pentecost, the Greek name for the Jewish Feast of Weeks. For Christians, Pentecost or Shavuot has many names in the Bible (the Feast of Weeks, the Feast of Harvest, and the Latter Firstfruits). Celebrated on the fiftieth day after Passover, Shavuot is traditionally a joyous time of giving thanks and presenting offerings for the new grain of the summer wheat harvest in Israel. The name 'Feast of Weeks' was given because God commanded the Jews in Leviticus 23:15-16, to count seven full weeks (or 49 days) beginning on the second day of Passover, and then present offerings of new grain to the Lord as a lasting ordinance. The observance of the Feast of Weeks or Pentecost is recorded in the Old Testament in Exodus 34:22, Leviticus 23:15-22, Deuteronomy 16:16, 2 Chronicles 8:13 and Ezekiel 1. Some of the most exciting events in the New Testament revolve around the Day of Pentecost in the book of Acts, chapter 2. Pentecost is also mentioned in Acts 20:16, 1 Corinthians 16:8 and James 1:18. This event commemorates the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the followers of Jesus Christ, as described in the second chapter of the Book of Acts.
Penticostals adhere to the inerrancy of scripture and the necessity of accepting Christ as personal Lord and Savior. they are distinguished by belief in the baptism with the Holy Spirit as an experience separate from conversion that enables a Christian to live a Holy Spirit–filled and empowered life. This empowerment includes the use of spiritual gifts such as speaking in tongues, miracles and 7 other gifts defining the characteristics of Pentecostals. Because of their commitment to biblical authority, spiritual gifts, and the miraculous, Pentecostals tend to see their faith as reflecting the same kind of spiritual power and teachings that were found in the Apostolic Age of the early church. For this reason, some Pentecostals also use the term Apostolic or full gospel to describe their Faith.
In Acts 1, just before the resurrected Jesus is taken up into heaven, he tells the disciples about the Father's promised gift of the Holy Spirit, which will soon be given to them in the form of a powerful baptism. He tells them to wait in Jerusalem until they receive the gift of the Holy Spirit, which will empower them to go out into the world and be his witnesses.
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Charismatic Church For Educational Purpose;
The term charismatic derives from the Greek word χάρισμα ('gift', itself derived from χάρις, 'grace' or 'favor'). This is the same origin for the word charismata, another term for spiritual gifts.
Charismatic Christianity (also known as Spirit-filled Christianity) is a form of Christianity that emphasizes the work of the Holy Spirit, spiritual gifts, and modern-day miracles. Practitioners are often called Charismatic Christians or renewalists. Although there is considerable overlap, Charismatic Christianity is often categorized into three separate groups: Pentecostalism, the Charismatic Movement, and neocharismatic movements. In 2011, Pentecostals and Charismatic Christians numbered over 500 million, a quarter of the world's 2 billion Christians
Charismatic Christianity is diverse, and it is not defined by acceptance of any particular doctrines, practices, or denominational structures. Rather, renewalists share a spirituality characterized by a worldview where miracles, signs and wonders, and other supernatural occurrences are expected to be present in the lives of believers. This includes the presence of spiritual gifts, such as prophecy and healing. While similar in many respects, renewalists do differ in important ways. These differences have led to Charismatic Christianity being categorized into three main groups: Pentecostalism, the charismatic movement, and neo-charismatic movements
Pentecostals are those Christians who identify with the beliefs and practices of classical Pentecostal denominations, such as the Assemblies of God or the Church of God (Cleveland, Tennessee). Classical Pentecostalism grew out of the holiness movement and developed a distinct identity at the start of the 20th century. At a time when most denominations affirmed cessationism (the belief that spiritual gifts had ceased), Pentecostals held that the gifts of the Holy Spirit were being restored to the Christian church. The distinctive doctrine of Pentecostalism is that there is a second work of grace after conversion, which Pentecostals call the baptism in the Holy Spirit, that is evidenced by glossolalia ('speaking in tongues')
The Catholic Charismatic Renewal is a movement within the Catholic Church. While the hierarchy of the Roman Catholic Church makes no distinction between churches, some charismatic parishes may practice 'worship outside of Mass,' including prayer meetings featuring alleged prophecy, faith healing and glossolalia. Proponents of the charismatic experience put forth the belief that certain charismata (a Greek word for gifts), bestowed by the Holy Spirit, such as the abilities to pray in tongues and to heal (which Christians generally believe existed in the early Church as described in the Bible) should still be practiced today
'A charismatic style of prayer is common at Christ the King. People are free to raise their hands in prayer and during songs, many pray their own prayers audibly, some pray in tongues, etc.... They pray with expressive or charismatic prayer at monthly parish prayer meetings, at the beginning of parish meetings, and most especially during certain moments in the Holy Mass. These are some of the external markers of a charismatic parish. Internal markers include a radical surrender to the Lordship of Jesus Christ in all parts of life, a strong adherence to the Gospel and the teachings of the Catholic Church, and the pursuit of strong friendships centered on Christ.'
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wy66  Offline  United States
Christopher Closeup The Christophers are a Christian inspirational group that was founded in 1945 by Father James Keller. The name of the group is derived from the Greek word christophoros, which means "Christ-bearer". Although the founders were Maryknoll priests, and the Roman Catholic orientation is overt, The Christophers preach a doctrine of religious tolerance[1] and intend their publications to be generally relevant to those of all faiths.

Founding

The early hints of the Cold war revived historical suspicion of Roman Catholic loyalty to the United States. In 1949, Time printed a debate between a Jesuit priest and Professor Walter Bowie of New York's Union Theological Seminary. Bowie stated that there was "a clearly stated Roman Catholic purpose to make America Catholic" and to jeopardize "the religious and civil liberties which have been the glory of Protestant countries . . . ."[2]

In response, a number of Roman Catholics began to find new ways of commending the Church and its ideal to the public, including the new medium of television. Perhaps the most notable of these men was Bishop Fulton Sheen. The most popular and influential television presentation, however, was The Christophers, a weekly half-hour program aired on ABC beginning in 1945. Keller avoided theology and philosophy, going "straight for the watcher's heart."[3]

o espouse the aims of The Christophers, Keller wrote an article for the conservative American Ecclesiastical Review entitled "What About the Hundred Million?" In it, he addressed the needs of Americans (including those from Protestant or other non-Catholic backgrounds) who had no connection to organized religion.[3]
Mission and activities

The motto of both the television show and The Christophers – "It's better to light a candle than to curse the darkness" – comes from an ancient Chinese proverb. The saying is reflected in the television show's theme song, "One Little Candle". It also reflects the philosophical orientation of the organization, which emphasizes positive action to create a better world in such various arenas as political honesty, caring for the sick and poor, and dealing with substance abuse.[4]

Although the foundation and media presentations are overtly Roman Catholic, they are intended to be ecumenical in scope. The organization states that it is "rooted in the Judeo-Christian tradition of service to God and humanity" and that "the Christophers embrace people of every nation, religion and age level."[5]

The Christophers are based in New York City. Their newsletter, Christopher News Notes, is published 10 times a year. They have produced a weekly television show (Christopher Closeup) since 1952, often featuring interviews with celebrities. Interviewees have included Bob Hope, Jack Benny, Ken Burns, Daniel Rodríguez, Andrew Weil, and Tim Russert.[6] Other incarnations of the show have included dramatic features, with guest stars Don Ameche, James Cagney, and Ricardo Montalban, among others. The show was originally broadcast on ABC,[7] but has since changed its name to Christopher Closeup and has been relegated to limited syndication by local cable channels.[8] It also syndicates a weekly radio program of the same name.[9]
The Christopher Awards

The Christopher Awards, made annually since 1949, salute media that "remind audiences and readers of their worth, individuality and power to positively impact and shape our world".[10] Recipients receive a bronze medallion, 4 inches (100 mm) in diameter, depicting a kneeling pilgrim, on whose back sits a radiant child.[11]

The awards have seven categories. Multiple awards are given each year in four categories: Books for Adults, Books for Young People, Feature Films, and Radio & Television. Three other categories generally have a single recipient: the Christopher Leadership Award, the Christopher Life Achievement Award, and the Special Christopher Award. The stated criteria are that nominees "exhibit exceptional artistic and technical proficiency, be able to impact the widest possible audience, and, above all, they must affirm the highest values of the human spirit." Potential winners are nominated and reviewed throughout the year by panels of media professionals, members of The Christophers’ staff with expertise in film, TV and publishing, and by specially supervised children’s reading groups.[10]

Awards are not limited to those with religious content, and adult content does not disqualify a work; "R-rated" movies, for example, are eligible for awards.[5]
Other activities

The Christophers also offer The Christopher Leadership Course, a course in public speaking and leadership. This course is held in many locations in the US, Canada and other countries.

http://christophers.org/
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