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Andy James Court
Andy James Court invites you all to experience ‘Remember’, his current CD compilation of Inspirational Gospel-Pop songs, that see us journey with him, as he reflects on his relationship with God.

These songs will take you down memory lane to when Andy first connected with God.
They talk about the things that have brought him closer to God, as well as those that have pulled him away.
They reveal his relationship as it was, as it is, and as it should be.

It’s Andy’s prayer that these musical compositions will not only be a source of joy to all that hear them, but that the songs will ignite a heart of worship, bringing people closer to God.

Andy goes by many titles: Singer, Songwriter, Producer, Husband, Daddy, Speaker, and Friend, however, it’s his title as “Child of the most High God” that motivates Andy to fuse all these together and dedicate his life to one of spreading the Gospel through song and testimony.

Andy’s love for music first began to sprout at the tender age of 5, when he’d sing harmonies in the back of the family car, whilst listening to reruns of ‘Grandma’s Feather Bed’ by John Denver. By age 8, his enthusiasm grew for all things music, as he endeavoured to teach himself guitar. His musical journey had just begun, but he was yet to embark on his walk with the Lord.

Growing up in a Christian family, having to go to church every Sunday morning, and attending an all-boys Christian school, did not automatically make Andy James Court, a Christian.
Andy spent most of his early years knowing of God, but not knowing God.

In his early 20s, Andy almost lost his life whilst out surfing. He was slammed mercilessly by a massive 20-foot wave, that not only knocked the air right out of him, but also proceeded to repeatedly suck him underwater, on the “washing machine” ride of his life. In a battle to break to the surface and take a breath, Andy recalls inwardly crying out to God and making a promise, that should he be delivered from the fury of this unrelenting wave, he would dedicate his life to serving God.

An overwhelming burst of fresh air eventually filled Andy’s aching lungs, as he lunged to the surface.

It would, however, take quite a number of years for Andy to recall this promise.

A supernatural encounter with the Living God, took this Perth boy’s life through a complete and radical change, from one of drugs and alcohol, exploring New Age beliefs, and playing in rock bands, to a life dedicated to spreading the message of the Gospel through music. Andy regretted the fact that he’d wasted so many valuable years chasing after worldly things with no eternal value. It wasn’t until he discovered the abundance of God’s Grace, that regret quickly transformed into a hope for the future, and a drive to share his experience with others. “ There were so many times my life could have ended abruptly, from drugs, motocross, car accidents, drowning, and the list goes on, but God had something else in store for me. He now uses my testimony to connect with others who are where I had been. He truly is a God of second chances.”

Three Multi-award winning Gospel albums later, Andy’s passion to tell the world about Jesus continues to burn brighter, as he sings about his journey with Christ during struggles, triumphs, heartache and joy. His musical style blends Contemporary Christian Pop, Black Gospel, Sounds of Africa and Inspirational Power Ballads.

Andy’s ability to connect with audiences on an open and intimate level, his approachable and humorous character, and his message, that flows straight from the heart, help build a bond between him and those who attend his concerts.

Andy has taken his music to churches, schools, prisons, stadiums and festivals, and his concerts and performances have been warmly embraced, touching the lives of thousands.

Andy is also an active partner of Compassion Australia, journeying with them in the work that they do in releasing children from poverty. With four sponsor children of their own, Andy and his wife Sharon regularly encourage people to sponsor a child and make a difference.

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God Is Light John 8:12 Then Jesus spoke to them again, saying, “I am the light of the world. He who follows Me shall not walk in darkness, but have the light of life.”
New King James Version (NKJV)

I love playing Guitar for the Lord, enjoy my page
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Steven  Offline  Canada
Steve
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SusanYu   United States
Susan Yu - Christian Musician
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Winterband Christian music videos WinterBand is an all original Christian band
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CMAC  Offline  
Christian/Musician/Singer/Songwriter My name is Chris McDonald i was a Supt. for a construction company but have been dealing with an illness for almost 2 years and haven't been able to work. I Love God and during this time he has allowed me to write 8 new songs that I am working on getting videos/sound files up for. If you are interested in hearing more about my story go here: https://fundrazr.com/campaigns/2Tp8b?
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White Stones White Stones is a Christian band with a new CD - White Stones. The CD features singer and songwriter Jimmy Workman, the bands leader. White Stones is made up of Jon Nijem on electric guitar, Myron Harper on drums, Chris Collins on bass, and Jimmy Workman on acoustic guitar and vocals. White Stones is based in Valdosta, GA. JimmyJons Records is the White Stones record label.
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Paul Hieser Music P H M is Paul Hieser and Lance Kamin. The band is based in the Stateline area of Illinois and Wisconsin. With a deep desire to serve God through music, PHM performs songs about the love and power of Christ, relationships and the world we live in.

A little about Paul Hieser (pronounced 'high-sir'):

'I started writing music 1 year after I received my first guitar. But, it wasn't until I gave my life to the Lord in 1996 that I began writing for Jesus.'
'Music has been in my family for generations. Dad played guitar and sang in many choirs, including Barber Shop Choirs (man, can those guys harmonize!). His brother sang and directed a church choir in rural Illinois. Mom played piano and autoharp. Her grandmother played piano as well. Both of my brothers are talented musicians and have performed professionally in their home states of Indiana and Texas.'
'My strength here on earth is my wife and soul-mate, Teri. Of all the people I know, I have never know anyone who expresses a love for God like her. Now, she'll tell you that she can't play an instrument or sing. BUT, she can write amazing lyrics! She has co-authored many songs for PHM.'
'Both of our sons have been blessed with the gift of music as well. Justin is a professional musician with Rise Records. Josh has had his music published through QuickStar Productions. More importantly, they are both saved by the grace of God!'
'I am excited that my friend and brother, Lance Kamin, has partnered with me in this music ministry. Lance brings another dimension of sound and wisdom to PHM. Lance, you rock brother!'
Praise God for His son, Jesus Christ, and for His continual inspiration through the Holy Spirit!

Gear Endorsements: Seagull, Epiphone, Fender acoustic guitars, Line 6, Acoustec, D'Addario, Ernie Ball, Shure

A little about Lance Kamin:

God has been a part of my life since I was young, but it wasn't until the early 90's that I personally asked Jesus Christ to take over my life. My supportive wife, Linda and I are a blended family with four sons and eight wonderful grandchildren!'
'I have enjoyed playing music since I was nine years old. I started learning piano, then started playing guitar and bass guitar in bands through out my teenage years. In the 70's, I was a “union musician” and I played with “show lounge” bands in the Chicago area. After being born again, I have had many opportunities to use the musical and vocal talent God has given me, in leading worship at various churches and playing keyboards with a Christian band called Cross Roads.'
'God is leading me down a slightly different path with Paul Hieser Music and I'm eagerly anticipating the work He will do through us. My hope is that through the talents that God has given to each one of us, a life will be changed through the words and music of the songs we perform. I will enjoy the challenges and joys of performing and writing with such talented and God-centered individual.' 'I am looking forward to what God has in store for the ministry of Paul Hieser Music!
'Praise be to God through Jesus Christ His only Son, in the power of the Holy Spirit.'

Gear Endorsements: Alesis, Casio, Digitech, Gibson, Ibanez, and Carvin, (don't I wish!)
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Gloria and Justine James :)
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Derekd  Offline  Canada
Derek's Music What then shall we say, brothers? When you come together, everyone has a hymn or a word of instruction, a revelation, a tongue or an interpretation. All of these must be done for the strengthening of the church. - 1 Corninthians 14:26 (NIV)
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brotherdavesbasement christian encouragement and guitar praise videos
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HGAMUSIC  Offline  United States
HGA BLESS ME Like a breath of fresh air, HGA's new album Innovation is a unique mixture of pop and edgy guitars with Christian lyrics that will have you listening again and again.'

To Contact The Artist Go To Myhgamusic.com
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Paul Poulton Project The Paul Poulton Project tour across the UK and the US digging their own rhythmic furrow. You'll get some modern-blues with some deep meaningful lyrics to touch your soul, coupled with some rock, gospel, swampy stuff and a whiff of funk. Musicianship comes high up their list of priorities.
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Guitar Church Tutorials Music is a large part of the human experience. We hear it everywhere in our culture and the predominant instrument of modern music is the guitar. If the number of guitars owned in the Western World could be counted we would all be amazed.
Since the majority of our culture’s music is played on the guitar, it would reason that such a device should be harnessed for God’s purposes. Guitar Church web site is here to help people fulfill the calling of God by their God given talents and gifts. It was also made to become an effective outreach tool. Guitar Church bridges a way to reach people for the Lord through a common interest.

The guitar is a popular musical instrument that makes sound by the playing of its (typically) six strings with the sound being projected either acoustically or through electrical amplification (for an acoustic guitar or an electric guitar, respectively). It is typically played by strumming or plucking the strings with the right hand while fretting the strings with the left hand. The guitar is a type of chordophone, traditionally constructed from wood and strung with either nylon or steel strings and distinguished from other chordophones by its construction and tuning. The modern guitar was preceded by the lute, the vihuela, the four-course Renaissance guitar, and the five-course baroque guitar, all of which contributed to the development of the modern six-string instrument.

There are three main types of modern acoustic guitar: the classical guitar (nylon-string guitar), the steel-string acoustic guitar, and the archtop guitar. The tone of an acoustic guitar is produced by the vibration of the strings, which is amplified by the body of the guitar, which acts as a resonating chamber. The classical guitar is often played as a solo instrument using a comprehensive fingerpicking technique.

Electric guitars, introduced in the 1930s, use an amplifier that can electronically manipulate and shape the tone. Early amplified guitars employed a hollow body, but a solid body was eventually found more suitable, as it was less prone to feedback. Electric guitars have had a continuing profound influence on popular culture. Guitars are recognized as a primary instrument in genres such as Praise and Worship, blues, bluegrass, country, flamenco, folk, jazz, jota, mariachi, metal, punk, reggae, rock, soul, and many forms of pop.
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Pastor I am an ordained minister, musician and I love worship on my acoustic.
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Elevation Worship So that people far from God will be raised to life in Christ. That was the vision of Elevation Church when it began in 2006 with a group of eight families led by Pastor Steven Furtick. Over the past seven years, that vision has remained the same as our church has grown to several locations throughout the Charlotte, NC area, with multiple extension sites around the U.S. and Canada.
worship2
From the beginning, Pastor Steven had a vision for Elevation Worship to write and record songs that reflect the church’s journey, experiences, and needs. The music released by Elevation Worship is characterized by a guitar-driven, versatile sound, and lyrics that reflect the “heart of the house”. The albums range from studio sessions that correspond with certain seasons in our church, to live recordings that reflect special nights of worship with the people of our church.
Worship Pastor Wade Joye says, “We have seen God do the impossible in our church time and time again, and we consider it such an honor to give voice through these songs to the great things He has done. Our prayer is that all who hear this music will be inspired to believe that the Lord can do the same in their own lives and churches.”
worship1
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Drums  Offline  United States
Drums In Church Top 10 Things Every Church Drummer Must PRACTICE UNTIL YOU CAN’T GET IT WRONG

There’s a famous, but anonymous, quote I remember my high school baseball coach liked to tell players: Don’t practice until you get it right. Practice until you can’t get it wrong. And this doesn’t start/end during rehearsal. It always begins with you alone, “in the woodshed, working on your chops,” until the instrument and the song are as natural as breathing. It’s the foundation for a player truly being free to worship, as opposed to staring at a lead sheet, overthinking the next drum fill, which often leads to missing Point #2…

TRANSITIONS ARE DOORS THAT LEAD TO LIFE OR DEATH
Transitions are both within songs (i.e. intros, outros, chorus/verse turns, entrance/exit of the bridge, etc.) and between songs (i.e. going from a fast song to a slow song or vice versa). These are doorways that can make or break – even train wreck a worship set. Unless you’re playing to tracks, there’s a good chance tempos (Point #3), song arrangements, and transitions may fluctuate a bit from leader to leader and from team to team. This is what band rehearsals are for. When everyone in the band knows it’s “all in” at the top of a song, or “down 1st time” at the top of the bridge, and collectively they do these with authority, it genuinely brings a confidence to the song/set that can be felt from the congregation. Blowing those intros/transitions can bring a pain so great, you’ll want to climb into the kick drum and hide.

THE METRONOME IS YOUR BEST FRIEND
Play to it when you practice. Play to it when you rehearse. Turn it on when you’re listening to music (using the “Tap Tempo” feature), especially when it’s the songs you’re preparing to play on Sunday. If you have an iPhone/iPad, the best app I’ve found is called Tempo. One of it’s best features for church drummers is that it allows you to share saved tempo markings/set lists via email, which is great if your church has more than one drummer. You’ll be surprised how much rehearsal time it saves if each drummer arrives already having tempos mapped out for the set. I highly recommend you also notify whoever keeps tabs on songs from week to week so they can mark that on all charts, just like the key of a song.

FOCUS ON THE LEADER
Keep a very sharp eye on the worship leader during rehearsal and also during the set – during rehearsal as he walks the band through each song, and during the set in case he wants to repeat a section or, in many cases, when he feels the need to vamp or “soak” in a particular moment. It’s easy for a drummer to zone out at rehearsal while the leader is working the background vocalists, but don’t let it happen to you. Stay dialed in. At a moment, he may be ready to pick it back up from the 2nd chorus leading into the bridge. You need to stay on the ready to arm the metronome – or “click” – and count everyone back in. I once heard a well-known touring/recording worship drummer say, “The drummer drives the bus, but the worship leader owns the bus.” Make sure you lead the way with confidence, but remember the leader is in charge.

ANTICIPATE, ANTICIPATE, ANTICIPATE
No doubt your leader has subtle and/or conspicuous cues – body language, subtle nods or even vocal pick ups – that give you a heads up where he’s headed. Learn them intimately… learn to anticipate those cues. Again, unless you’re playing to tracks, even following a chart/lead sheet hopefully leaves a little bit of room for the leader to truly lead the set as the Holy Spirit leads him. The better you are at focusing on what he’s doing before he does it, the better the time of worship will be. If you’re starting/stopping the click between songs so the leader can exhort the congregation, learn to anticipate when you can start it back up before the intro of the next song. Or if you’re coming to the end of a song, pay attention to how quickly he may want the click turned off so he can vamp softly, maybe with just acoustic guitar or pads at the end of a slow song. Our primary worship leader likes to stomp his right foot if he wants the band to stay in strong rather than drop out. This often depends on how engaged the audience is. But all that to say: stay focused and anticipate

DYNAMICS SEPARATE MEN FROM BOYS
Sure, you can play the song in your sleep now and can read the worship leader’s mind, but playing with dynamics is what separates the men from the boys. Think of it as using a box of 8 crayons versus a box of 64 crayons. Blue doesn’t necessarily mean just blue. For example, your velocity building up from a down bridge to an “all in” bridge the 2nd time through could display a dozen “shades of blue” within the phrase. Worship songs have a natural arc to them, like a good film. Make use of that arc with solid dynamics. The best drummers in the world live in what’s called the “pocket.” What is the “pocket” you ask? Here’s a great blog post on “Pocket Philosophy”: Make your home there. Mastering this with great tempo will get you invited to play again and again.

IT IS A SONG SO TREAT IT THAT WAY
Just because you may not need to know if the chorus starts on C Major versus A Minor, you do need to know the “story” of the song. Pay attention to the lyrics – both the actual words and their rhythm in phrase. Does your kick pattern complement it? What about your cymbal “coloring” while the leader is quietly strumming on guitar at the end of a song? You’re not just laying down a groove. You’re telling a story. Think of the journey of the song GREAT I AM (YouTube: https://youtu.be/J5CWGi82N7k). Is what you’re playing reflecting the imagery of “The mountains shake before you; the demons run and flee” in the bridge? And reflecting back on Point #6, are your dynamics also helping to reflect that imagery through the end of the bridge?

BE A STUDENT OF THE GAME
Study other drummers. Watch YouTube videos. Go back and listen to your board mixes if they’re recorded. Share what works or what doesn’t work with the other drummers at church. Read blogs like the one on “Pocket Philosophy.” Then play until you find your own natural pocket. Whatever it takes… be a student of the game – one who refuses to plateau but keeps pressing on to get better and better and better. Our church streams each Sunday service in full, including the worship set. I go back and watch the set, usually on Monday mornings, and critique myself from beginning to end. It’s kind of like an NFL quarterback watching game film. I know I will have played many of those songs multiple times before – at the same tempo and on the same road map – but there are always subtle things I’ll find, where I can improve on my game the next time I play those same songs.

KEEP YOUR KIT TUNED, WELL-MAINTAINED, AND UPGRADED
You’d think this is a no-brainer. But sadly it isn’t. Change your heads every 4-6 months, be careful not to “gorilla tighten” stands/tom arms (which make it difficult for the next drummer to make adjustments without destroying the gear), leave the area cleaner than you found it, and, if you lay off the 4 cup of pre-gig coffee long enough, you may find you’ve saved up more than you need for that cymbal or snare you’ve been drooling over. By the way, put down that roll of duct tape. It never, ever belongs on a drum kit. But that’s another conversation for another day… In the meantime, try Moongel if you must.

YOUR MIX IS JUST THAT – YOUR MIX
Assuming you’ve been assigned your own monitor mix (using headphones, in-ears or an old school monitor), make sure your mix is just right for you. Building from Point #4 and being able to focus on the leader, make sure you have what you need in your mix and remove or at least drop the rest. Just because there are background vocalists on stage doesn’t mean you need them all in your mix (unless one of them steps out to lead a song of course). Just because there’s a second acoustic guitar on stage while the leader is also playing one doesn’t mean you need both of them in your mix. And, you may also need a little more click than the rest of the band. Take time to get that stuff right during rehearsal. Fixing your mix during the set is distracting, even if you have the ability to make your own tweaks on the fly. My personal preference is plenty of click, plenty of lead vocal, plenty of kick, and then fill in the rest accordingly.

Have fun, engage in worship, burn some calories and, for goodness sake, live in the pocket!

You are here: Home / Instruction / Top 10 Things Every Church Drummer Must Know – by Mike Murray
Top 10 Things Every Church Drummer Must Know – by Mike Murray
April 15, 2015 19 Comments

Top 10 Things Every Church Drummer MustPRACTICE UNTIL YOU CAN’T GET IT WRONG
There’s a famous, but anonymous, quote I remember my high school baseball coach liked to tell players: Don’t practice until you get it right. Practice until you can’t get it wrong. And this doesn’t start/end during rehearsal. It always begins with you alone, “in the woodshed, working on your chops,” until the instrument and the song are as natural as breathing. It’s the foundation for a player truly being free to worship, as opposed to staring at a lead sheet, overthinking the next drum fill, which often leads to missing Point #2…

TRANSITIONS ARE DOORS THAT LEAD TO LIFE OR DEATH
Transitions are both within songs (i.e. intros, outros, chorus/verse turns, entrance/exit of the bridge, etc.) and between songs (i.e. going from a fast song to a slow song or vice versa). These are doorways that can make or break – even train wreck a worship set. Unless you’re playing to tracks, there’s a good chance tempos (Point #3), song arrangements, and transitions may fluctuate a bit from leader to leader and from team to team. This is what band rehearsals are for. When everyone in the band knows it’s “all in” at the top of a song, or “down 1st time” at the top of the bridge, and collectively they do these with authority, it genuinely brings a confidence to the song/set that can be felt from the congregation. Blowing those intros/transitions can bring a pain so great, you’ll want to climb into the kick drum and hide.

THE METRONOME IS YOUR BEST FRIEND
Play to it when you practice. Play to it when you rehearse. Turn it on when you’re listening to music (using the “Tap Tempo” feature), especially when it’s the songs you’re preparing to play on Sunday. If you have an iPhone/iPad, the best app I’ve found is called Tempo. One of it’s best features for church drummers is that it allows you to share saved tempo markings/set lists via email, which is great if your church has more than one drummer. You’ll be surprised how much rehearsal time it saves if each drummer arrives already having tempos mapped out for the set. I highly recommend you also notify whoever keeps tabs on songs from week to week so they can mark that on all charts, just like the key of a song.

FOCUS ON THE LEADER
Keep a very sharp eye on the worship leader during rehearsal and also during the set – during rehearsal as he walks the band through each song, and during the set in case he wants to repeat a section or, in many cases, when he feels the need to vamp or “soak” in a particular moment. It’s easy for a drummer to zone out at rehearsal while the leader is working the background vocalists, but don’t let it happen to you. Stay dialed in. At a moment, he may be ready to pick it back up from the 2nd chorus leading into the bridge. You need to stay on the ready to arm the metronome – or “click” – and count everyone back in. I once heard a well-known touring/recording worship drummer say, “The drummer drives the bus, but the worship leader owns the bus.” Make sure you lead the way with confidence, but remember the leader is in charge.

ANTICIPATE, ANTICIPATE, ANTICIPATE
No doubt your leader has subtle and/or conspicuous cues – body language, subtle nods or even vocal pick ups – that give you a heads up where he’s headed. Learn them intimately… learn to anticipate those cues. Again, unless you’re playing to tracks, even following a chart/lead sheet hopefully leaves a little bit of room for the leader to truly lead the set as the Holy Spirit leads him. The better you are at focusing on what he’s doing before he does it, the better the time of worship will be. If you’re starting/stopping the click between songs so the leader can exhort the congregation, learn to anticipate when you can start it back up before the intro of the next song. Or if you’re coming to the end of a song, pay attention to how quickly he may want the click turned off so he can vamp softly, maybe with just acoustic guitar or pads at the end of a slow song. Our primary worship leader likes to stomp his right foot if he wants the band to stay in strong rather than drop out. This often depends on how engaged the audience is. But all that to say: stay focused and anticipate

DYNAMICS SEPARATE MEN FROM BOYS
Sure, you can play the song in your sleep now and can read the worship leader’s mind, but playing with dynamics is what separates the men from the boys. Think of it as using a box of 8 crayons versus a box of 64 crayons. Blue doesn’t necessarily mean just blue. For example, your velocity building up from a down bridge to an “all in” bridge the 2nd time through could display a dozen “shades of blue” within the phrase. Worship songs have a natural arc to them, like a good film. Make use of that arc with solid dynamics. The best drummers in the world live in what’s called the “pocket.” What is the “pocket” you ask? Here’s a great blog post on “Pocket Philosophy”: Make your home there. Mastering this with great tempo will get you invited to play again and again.

IT IS A SONG SO TREAT IT THAT WAY
Just because you may not need to know if the chorus starts on C Major versus A Minor, you do need to know the “story” of the song. Pay attention to the lyrics – both the actual words and their rhythm in phrase. Does your kick pattern complement it? What about your cymbal “coloring” while the leader is quietly strumming on guitar at the end of a song? You’re not just laying down a groove. You’re telling a story. Think of the journey of the song GREAT I AM (YouTube: https://youtu.be/J5CWGi82N7k). Is what you’re playing reflecting the imagery of “The mountains shake before you; the demons run and flee” in the bridge? And reflecting back on Point #6, are your dynamics also helping to reflect that imagery through the end of the bridge?

BE A STUDENT OF THE GAME
Study other drummers. Watch YouTube videos. Go back and listen to your board mixes if they’re recorded. Share what works or what doesn’t work with the other drummers at church. Read blogs like the one on “Pocket Philosophy.” Then play until you find your own natural pocket. Whatever it takes… be a student of the game – one who refuses to plateau but keeps pressing on to get better and better and better. Our church streams each Sunday service in full, including the worship set. I go back and watch the set, usually on Monday mornings, and critique myself from beginning to end. It’s kind of like an NFL quarterback watching game film. I know I will have played many of those songs multiple times before – at the same tempo and on the same road map – but there are always subtle things I’ll find, where I can improve on my game the next time I play those same songs.

KEEP YOUR KIT TUNED, WELL-MAINTAINED, AND UPGRADED
You’d think this is a no-brainer. But sadly it isn’t. Change your heads every 4-6 months, be careful not to “gorilla tighten” stands/tom arms (which make it difficult for the next drummer to make adjustments without destroying the gear), leave the area cleaner than you found it, and, if you lay off the 4 cup of pre-gig coffee long enough, you may find you’ve saved up more than you need for that cymbal or snare you’ve been drooling over. By the way, put down that roll of duct tape. It never, ever belongs on a drum kit. But that’s another conversation for another day… In the meantime, try Moongel if you must.

YOUR MIX IS JUST THAT – YOUR MIX
Assuming you’ve been assigned your own monitor mix (using headphones, in-ears or an old school monitor), make sure your mix is just right for you. Building from Point #4 and being able to focus on the leader, make sure you have what you need in your mix and remove or at least drop the rest. Just because there are background vocalists on stage doesn’t mean you need them all in your mix (unless one of them steps out to lead a song of course). Just because there’s a second acoustic guitar on stage while the leader is also playing one doesn’t mean you need both of them in your mix. And, you may also need a little more click than the rest of the band. Take time to get that stuff right during rehearsal. Fixing your mix during the set is distracting, even if you have the ability to make your own tweaks on the fly. My personal preference is plenty of click, plenty of lead vocal, plenty of kick, and then fill in the rest accordingly.

Have fun, engage in worship, burn some calories and, for goodness sake, live in the pocket!
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